How overdose kits are saving lives

How overdose kits are saving lives

More than 24,000 people die from heroin and prescription opioid overdoses each year (Drug War Facts). Even when addicts overdose in the presence of others, paramedics might not arrive in time to save their lives, and many people are reluctant to immediately call emergency services out of fear of getting the addict in trouble. However, recent developments in drug technology may help reverse this trend. Overdose kits containing naloxone, once limited to hospitals, are becoming increasingly popular in non-medical settings to provide rapid response medical care for opioid overdoses. Read more

National Rehab Awareness Week: Disability and heroin

National Rehab Awareness Week: Disability and heroin

While heroin use is declining overall, it still remains a problem for a large number of vulnerable Americans. Perhaps the demographic that is the most vulnerable to heroin abuse is the disabled community. As many as 50 million Americans currently live with a physical or mental disability, and many of these citizens have turned to substance abuse to cope with the difficulties that they face. In honor of Disability Awareness Week, it’s time to take a look at the very real relationship between disabilities and the increased risk of heroin use. Read more

National Rehab Awareness Week: Disability and painkillers

National Rehab Awareness Week: Disability and painkillers

Monday, September 28 kicks off National Rehab Awareness week, a time to remember the special needs of more than 50 million Americans with some form of disability. One of the most pressing needs of the disabled community is increased awareness on substance abuse. Disabled people are disproportionately more affected by drug and medication addiction than the general population. According to Disabled World, as many as 25 percent of disabled people have a substance abuse disorder. Often times, they become addicted to the very medication used to treat their disability. In light of National Rehab Awareness Week, there’s no better time than now to address this alarming trend and start working toward a solution. Read more

National Rehab Awareness Week: Alcoholism and disability

National Rehab Awareness Week: Alcoholism and disability

National Rehab Awareness Week starts on September 20. The week serves to remind the nation that about 50 million Americans currently have disabilities and are in need of help. One of the major issues afflicting the disabled population is the burden of addiction. Disabled people are disproportionately plagued by substance abuse. According to Disabled World, people with physical or mental disabilities are two to four times more likely to have an alcohol or substance abuse problem than the general population. In fact, about one in four disabled Americans suffers an additional substance abuse problem. While alcoholism can feel like an insurmountable trial for anyone, disabled people encounter perhaps the most barriers of any alcoholic on the road to recovery. Read more

The hazards of discarded needles, syringes and medical refuse

The hazards of discarded needles, syringes and medical refuse

Safe disposal of medical refuse is essential to prevent the spread of disease. Incineration or burning of medical refuse is an effective way to destroy contaminated items but, due to environmental concerns, industrialized countries are finding other ways to dispose of the detritus. Medical waste typically includes sharp items like needles and scalpels, pathological waste from laboratories, anatomical parts from surgeries and autopsies, chemical and pharmaceutical waste and even radioactive waste from therapy and research. Read more