Stimulant addicts can quit smoking without hindering treatment

Stimulant addicts can quit smoking without hindering treatment

Cigarettes share a long history of being associated with stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamines. In fact, a 2008 study showed that 68 percent of people with a substance abuse problem also use tobacco, compared to just 28 percent of the total population (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration). People who are addicted to one substance are often addicted to several, which can make recovery from either substance far more complicated. However, recent findings by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have found that recovering stimulant addicts can quit smoking with no negative effects on their recovery.

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National Rehab Awareness Week: Depression and addiction among the disabled

National Rehab Awareness Week: Depression and addiction among the disabled

People with disabilities face a greater number of hardships in their day-to-day lives than the general public. Consequently, many disabled people suffer from depression. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, people with disabilities are more likely to suffer from clinical depression that requires professional treatment. As part of National Rehabilitation Awareness Week, it’s important to understand the dangers of depression and the risks of an associated addiction. Read more

National Rehab Awareness Week: Disability and painkillers

National Rehab Awareness Week: Disability and painkillers

Monday, September 28 kicks off National Rehab Awareness week, a time to remember the special needs of more than 50 million Americans with some form of disability. One of the most pressing needs of the disabled community is increased awareness on substance abuse. Disabled people are disproportionately more affected by drug and medication addiction than the general population. According to Disabled World, as many as 25 percent of disabled people have a substance abuse disorder. Often times, they become addicted to the very medication used to treat their disability. In light of National Rehab Awareness Week, there’s no better time than now to address this alarming trend and start working toward a solution. Read more

National Rehab Awareness Week: Alcoholism and disability

National Rehab Awareness Week: Alcoholism and disability

National Rehab Awareness Week starts on September 20. The week serves to remind the nation that about 50 million Americans currently have disabilities and are in need of help. One of the major issues afflicting the disabled population is the burden of addiction. Disabled people are disproportionately plagued by substance abuse. According to Disabled World, people with physical or mental disabilities are two to four times more likely to have an alcohol or substance abuse problem than the general population. In fact, about one in four disabled Americans suffers an additional substance abuse problem. While alcoholism can feel like an insurmountable trial for anyone, disabled people encounter perhaps the most barriers of any alcoholic on the road to recovery. Read more

The addictive potential of marijuana

The addictive potential of marijuana

Contrary to common perception, marijuana can be addictive. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, research reveals that about one in 11 users have the potential to become addicted to marijuana. This figure is considerably higher among those who start using marijuana as teenagers (one in six) and even greater among individuals who use it daily (almost 25 to 50 percent).

Marijuana is the most widely and commonly used illicit drug, according to the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The United Nations revealed 158.8 million people around the world use marijuana, which encompasses more than 3.8 percent of the planet’s population. Over 94 million people in the U.S. have admitted using pot at least once. Read more